• Valerie Just

Thank a Pollinator!


June 17-23rd - NATIONAL POLLINATOR WEEK!

Visit the Pollinator.Org website to read more about celebrating National Pollinator Week.

This website provides a list of native pollinator plants by region - just log your zip code, and view your region's planting guide! You can also view blogs on my website where I provide pictures and scientific names of native plants for the state of Iowa, or zone 4 and 5.

I ask you to consider planting native plants in your region; native plants sustain the pollinators in that they provide pollen and nectar in greater volumes than cultivar plants. Cultivars are plants that have been bred for specific characteristics, such as color or height; however, the breeding of plants in this manner causes a loss in more important ingredients for our pollinators.

Spread the word - help others to make a difference!!

LOCAL DOINGS!

Kim Reynolds proclaims National Pollinator Week in Iowa https://www.pollinator.org/…/…/Iowa-Pollinator-Week-2019.pdf

Pollinator Fest at Reiman's Garden, Ames, Iowa https://www.catchdesmoines.com/event/pollinator-fest/17890/

Build a Bee Hotel - Cedar Rapids, Iowa https://www.eventbrite.com/e/build-your-own-bee-hotel-ticke…

Here is information that I posted previously, but with the onset of pollinator week, I am re-posting:

Why Plant Native Flowers?

Our pollinators, butterflies, bees and a host of insects depend on natural nectar from flowers to survive. Due to many factors including loss of natural habitat, disturbance and the misuse of agricultural herbicides and chemicals, our pollinators are facing great dangers that threaten their very existence.

In addition to this, the garden centers are loaded with colorful plants that have been genetically altered, cultivated and hybridized. The genetic changes made to these plants have changed far more than the outward appearance. It has altered the nectar producing ability inside the flowers. They no longer provide the rich nectar found in natural plants. Many have little to no nectar or may be sterile and have no food value at all. In the effort to have compact, long blooming flowers with multiple color choices, we have reduced our gardens to a visual display that doesn’t provide a necessary food source to the visiting butterflies and bees. They come looking for it and appear to be working at it, but they do so for little reward. Native flowers have the nectar and pollen that will keep our butterflies, bees and all pollinators growing and sustaining.


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